The Blythewood Historical Society & Museum is set to begin the second phase of its new museum design. The planned work includes updating the museum’s exhibits, according to historian and consultant Staci Rickey of Access Preservation. Phase three will involve renovations to the building to return it to its original 1904 look.

The continuation of the multiyear project is possible after grants from the Richland County Preservation Commission, S.C. Humanities and the Richland County government.

The museum will kick off phase two with a presentation and reception Sunday, Oct. 4 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the historic Langford-Nord House at 100 McNulty Street. After a short welcome and introduction, attendees will be invited inside to tour the museum in small groups for social distancing, with masks required. The event is free and open to the public.

The first phase of the multiyear renovation project, the Train Room, opened last November. The exhibit features a large 3-D mural by renowned South Carolina artist Harold Branham depicting the 1850s-era Blythewood train depot. It also includes artifacts from the original Blythewood train station, including a telegraph machine and iron rail line.

The Blythewood Historical Society & Museum was established in 2010 to protect, nurture and support the historical, prehistorical, and cultural heritage of Blythewood through preservation, advocacy and education. More information can be provided by Margaret Kelly at 803-333-8133 Tuesday through Thursdays between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.

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